Repair Guide: ND Mazda MX-5 touchscreen cracks / de-lamination

This is a guide on how to replace the touchscreen on a Mazdaconnect infotainment system.

This guide involves some basic tools and a $15-$25 part from Aliexpress. It is significantly cheaper than having a dealership replace the entire CMU ($1500+), or DIY replacing the whole screen assembly($200).

The problem: Repeated hot/cold cycles causes de-lamination of the adhesive used to combine the touchscreen cover and the digitizer. This failure was a manufacturing defect, and newer vehicles produced by Mazda do not have this problem.

If your car is experiencing any of the issues seen below, this operation may be required to resolve.

If your car is still under full warranty, you can get it replaced at no charge. Info

Note: I took these pictures while re-assembling, after fixing my screen. If something doesn’t look right, let me know. Certain steps in this guide must be done with extreme caution to not damage the screen PCB. If you are not comfortable with working on electronics, do not begin this guide.

If you found this guide helpful, please consider using the affiliate links below to purchase Tools needed for this project. 

Buy Replacement touchscreen from Aliexpress

TL;DR FreePBX and Polycom VVX provisioning

This guide will quickly give you very important information you need on provisioning VVX phones with FreePBX

When a phone is factory reset, it will get a DHCP lease.

Polycom VVX phones have a mac address starting with 0004F2. You can create a policy in Windows DHCP server to allocate specific IPs to the phones

Polycom phones utilize DHCP option 160 to find a provisioning server. The contents of option 160 must be in string format. (e.g. tftp://192.168.1.10)

For time synchronization, DHCP option 42 must be set.

They also use DHCP option 002 to get the time offset. 

I use software called Tftpd64 to create a tftp server on my windows PCs. I tell it which folder I dump all my config files into.

when the phone boots, it will look for [mac address].cfg, if it can’t find that, it will look for [mac address]-web.cfg, then 000000000000.cfg.

000000000000.cfg is supposed to be the catchall for phone provisioning. It should not contain any actual phone provisioning commands, it only helps the phone point to other configuration files.

Example 000000000000.cfg here

Polycom recommends using XML Notepad by Microsoft to edit these files.

000000000000.cfg defines the following settings before the phone boots:

  • the firmware update file location
  • which config files to load (I recommend setting up a generalize.cfg file, then a [PHONE_MAC_ADDRESS]-sip.cfg file for each individual phone)
  • where to store boot logs (polycom phones will write its boot logs back to the TFTP server)
  • where to store call history logs (polycom phones will write this back to the TFTP server)

This is an example deployment scenario:

  1. The phone reads 000000000000.cfg because it couldn’t find [phone mac].cfg or [phone mac]-web.cfg
  2. Phone will check for firmware updates defined in the file, if none are found it will continue
  3. 000000000000.cfg points to generalize.cfg and [PHONE_MAC_ADDRESS]-sip.cfg
  4. generalize.cfg is read and applied (these settings apply to all phones)
  5. [PHONE_MAC_ADDRESS]-sip.cfg is substituted for the phones MAC, and then is read. (these settings contain passwords, and settings specific to that phone)
  6. The phone boots

The following settings are important for a FreePBX Deployment

generalize.cfg – Settings that don’t change, used by all phones.

msg.mwi.1.callBackMode=”contact” – This is part of the fix for the voicemail button. By default it is set to “register”, but FreePBX requires SIP phones to call a number to get voicemail

voIpProt.SIP.AlertInfo.1.value=”Auto Answer” – When a user dials *80[ext], typically the phone will autoanswer. This is known as page/intercom mode. Special SIP headers are sent by FreePBX so the phone recognizes a page from a regular call. Setting this will make the phone aware of a page

voIpProt.SIP.AlertInfo.1.class=”ringAutoAnswer” – your polycom phone has profiles that define what ringtone to use, how many times to ring, and to auto answer. This setting will tell the phone to auto answer if the SIP.AlertInfo field equals “Auto Answer”

attendant.resourceList.1.label=”Page All” – I have my main page group set to 900 in FreePBX -> Applications -> Paging and Intercom -> Page Group. These commands will create a softkey button to page all phones in page group 900.

attendant.resourceList.1.address=”900″

attendant.resourceList.1.type=”normal”

[PHONE_MAC_ADDRESS]-sip.cfg – you will need one of these per phone, since the attributes defined in this file are specific to each phone

msg.mwi.1.subscribe=”[ext]” – enter your sip extension here to get the mailbox to work

msg.mwi.1.callBack=”*98[ext]” – enter *98 and your sip extension here. This is the number that is called when the voicemail button is pressed.

 

Other notes:

  • Web interface changes:
    • Whenever you manually go into the web interface and make a phone setting change, the phone will write a file [phonemac]-web.cfg to the TFTP server
    • This will prevent it from loading 000000000000.cfg in the future.
  • Web browser:
    • The VVX phones have a full featured web browser, good for internal company resources, or in my case, garage door openers, door buzzers, etc.
    • see mb.main.home for more info

Stereo install: XAV-AX100 in a 2018 Subaru WRX Premium

This is a technical guide on how to wire in an aftermarket radio in a 2018 WRX Premium

General Notes:

  • XAV-AX100 does not have AUX Inputs
  • 2018 WRX with 2 USB ports won’t work unless OEM USB module is swapped to one with single USB port.
  • OEM Subaru Microphone is not compatible with any aftermarket head unit. Use microphone supplied with Sony system.

Tools:

Wiring Diagram

What isn’t shown

  • USB Connector
  • Antenna Connector

Basic Functionality

  • Sony XAV-AX100 (duh). Other compatible models include XAV-AX200, and XAV-AX5000 (wiring harness is identical)
  • Scosche SU2031B Dash Kit Gloss Black – not cheap, but fits better than Metra 95-8907HG
  • Metra 40-LX11 – adapts the subaru/lexus/toyota/scion square antenna to the round motorola type. Extra blue wire hanging off is not used. clip off.
  • Metra 70-1761 – main harness, power, front rear speakers. Simply match colors from sony end to Metra end, and (preferably) solder, properly crimped butt connectors also work.

Adding more functionality

AX-SUB28SWC-6V – subaru/toyota/lexus/scion use a standard 28 pin connector.

This connector has the capability to provide:

  • reverse camera video and power
  • aux input
  • steering wheel control (2 banks of resistors)
  • vehicle speed sense (Pulse)
  • parking brake sense (GND activated)
  • reverse gear sense (+12V)
  • CANBUS
  • powered microphone power and audio

However not all features are available in the WRX, as some pins are missing.

The AX-SUB28SWC-6V requires modification to work with the WRX.
This is the only option available for retaining steering wheel control and backup cam. Out of the entire install, this part gave me the most trouble because the connector had to be re-pinned.

Luckily I made a diagram that should help you figure out what goes where.

When it was all said and done, I only needed 5 of the pins in the 28 pin connector:

  • Reverse Trigger
  • Parking Brake
  • SWC Ground
  • SWC Bank 1
  • SWC Bank 2

Also note: the Metra connector is fragile, do not force in.

Steering Wheel Control

The black connector end of the AX-SUB28SWC typically connects to a Metra Axxess ASWC-1 can be chopped off, because the XAV-AX100 is capable of reading the signals directly from the steering wheel via pins 21-23 on the 28 pin connector
Pins 21-13 can be soldered/crimped directly to the 3.5mm jack, then connected to the “remote” port on the XAV-AX100 (see wiring diagram)

Backup Camera

the WRX backup cam requires 6V. The AX-SUB28SWC-6V includes a 12 to 6V converter for this purpose.
When shifted into reverse, pin 2 of the 28 pin connector is given 12V. That 12V is sent into the 12to6 adapter, and 6V gets sent out to power the reverse camera.
The 2018 WRX Premium uses a 5 pin connector for backup camera video and power, instead of the 28 pin (as is common in other Toyotas)
If yours uses the 5 pin, there is no known wiring harness you can buy to adapt the backup camera. We must make our own with breadboard jumpers.

Take 5 of those wires, and cut and strip them, the bare wire side will be soldered to:

  1. Ground
  2. 6V in (from 6V out on the 12to6 converter)
  3. VID (+) (RCA Shield)
  4. VID (-) (RCA Center)
  5. Not used

stick them into the OEM camera harness and tape  (see wiring diagram for detailed info)

USB Ports

AX-SUBUSB2 Converts a standard male USB connection to the subaru connector found on the OEM harness. This allows you to use the OEM usb ports in your car, with an aftermarket stereo.

(This only works out of the box with WRX’s with a single USB port in center console)Newer WRXs have 2 USB ports and have a builtin USB hub. Since Android Auto/CarPlay is not compatible with USB hubs, a single Aux/USB combo module from 15-17 WRX can be swapped in, if needed. (video coming soon)

Aftermarket Door Speakers

Metra 72-8104 – door speaker, minor modification to plastic adapter required to get proper fitment

Screws (3 per door). OEM screws that connect speaker to door, have too large of a head to accommodate the Metra 72-8104. Any hardware store will carry a screw with a smaller head that won’t interfere with the speaker adapter. (these are not machine screws, they have pointed tips, they go into the plastic inserts in the door)

Speaker Foam – Creates a seal between the speaker frame and plastic Metra adapter to prevent vibrations.

Dynamat (recommended) – Stick inside door panel, reduces vibrations, gives door speakers more bass, and makes interior quieter

 

Steps Afterward

After you get everything running you’ll want to do a couple things:

  • Test the backup cam by going into reverse
  • Turn off the ugly proximity lines in the head unit settings.
  • Program steering wheel controls in custom mode
  • Customize your XAV’s wallpaper
  • Firmware update your XAV
  • Make sure all FM stations are coming in, (test fringe stations to check if the antenna amp is working)
  • Load up android auto and check if the parking brake sensor works
  • turn on/off your headlights to see if the illumination/dimmer wire works.

Scion tC gen 1 reverse wire tap

Quick tip. Avoid running a positive wire from the tail light harness to your head unit for a backup camera


this pink wire in the driver side kick panel cover is the wire that provides 12V when the car is in reverse. Plug this into your head unit to automatically bring up the reverse camera

 

its position in the harness is bottom left

here is a photo from the wiring diagram

Here is a photo from further back

Quick Fix: Can’t remove group policy comment

Came across this bizarre problem with group policy.

I Configured a GPO to enabled with a comment, later set it to not configured and removed the comment.

When I came to check back, the GPO was not configured, but comment was still there

Seems to be a problem with Server 2008, and in Server 2012 R2. Microsoft is unwilling to fix a cosmetic issue, so here is a workaround.

This workaround will delete all comments in the GPO. You’ve been warned.

Some of you may know Group Policies are stored in \\domain\SYSVOL\Policies\{UID}

  • Go into your group policy management MMC find your offending policy, go to the Details tab, and find the Unique ID
  • Open your SYSVOL Directory and find the policy by UID. Make sure you’re logged into your primary domain controller with sufficient rights.
  • Depending on if your Policy is Machine or User, go into that folder and delete the Comment.cmtx file

Background: Comment.cmtx is created in SYSVOL once you add a comment to your group policy object. Deleting it won’t break anything.

Enabling WiFi on Screenly OSE [Digital signage for Raspberry Pi]

Screenly is a preconfigured port of Raspbian, a Linux distribution for Raspberry Pi devices.

In Screenly’s FAQ, they say console login and wifi aren’t recommended, but in this tutorial, we will show you how to do all that.

1. Hook up a keyboard to your Pi while screenly is booted

2. Press Ctrl+Alt+F1 to open a terminal

3. Enter credentials pi | raspberry

4. Follow this guide to set up wifi normally

5. Reboot and it should connect, verify by going into the console and typing ifconfig

Some other info:

  • It appears Screenly uses UZBL, a webkit web browser to display webpages.
  • After getting into the console and logging in, you can do run startx, this will open the screenly application. Pressing Windows key+ D will get you to the desktop.
  • Screenly uses a lightweight DE called black box.
  • Right clicking the desktop will give you a couple extra options.

2015 Macbook and iPad Pro model numbers revealed

Didn’t see this anywhere else on the internet, it seems I just found these model numbers

2015 Apple Macbook

  • Input voltage (USB-C) 14.5V 2A
  • Model: A1534
  • FCCID: BCG-A1534

Suposed iPad Pro

  • FCC ID: BCG-A1489
  • Model Name: A1622, A1623
  • Input voltage: 20V 4.25A, 5V 1A
  • Interesting note, it looks like the iPad Pro may have USB type C for charging instead of lightning.

Apple Watch

  • FCC ID: BCG-E2871
  • Model Name: A1554, A1638

Other things

  • APPLE WATCH MAGNETIC CHARGING CABLE
  • MODEL NUMBER: A1570
  • Magnetic Charging Case
  • Model number: A1647
  • APPLE WATCH MAGNETIC CHARGING TRY-ON CASE
  • MODEL NUMBER: A1668
  • APPLE WATCH MAGNETIC CHARGING CABLE FOR DISPLAY CASE
  • MODEL NUMBER: A1667

Online Camera stores to avoid

Here’s a list of online camera stores to avoid, these commonly pop up on Google Shopping, and Google doesn’t seem to care enough to take them down.

These vendors are generally shady, try to upsell you on accessories or “the real version” of what you’re trying to buy. Almost all of these vendors are not Nikon or Canon authorized vendors.

What you shouldn’t do

  • Buy their product direct from their website, especially if using a credit card number
  • Buy their product on eBay without carefully reading the listing

What you can do:

Buy their product on eBay or in store, after carefully reading the listing/ what they have to say

  • These vendors do have some loopholes they can go around like the “US Warranty” badge when selling a gray-market camera
  • Gray market cameras are cameras imported from other countries, that Canon or Nikon will refuse to service from a US Warranty.
  • The US Warranty the seller offers is mediocre at best, don’t rely on it at all.
  • Always make sure to check what’s inside the box, make sure the lens they say you’re getting is what you actually get.
  • A lot of these lens+body bundles were “split” to be sold separately for profit, then bundled with another cheaper lens. A Canon reputable dealer is not allowed to do this.
  • In the end, if you don’t get what you paid for, you do have recourse if you bought on eBay.
  • eBay generally sides with customers for complaints and will refund you if you receive an item that wasn’t as described

Vendors to avoid include:

  • Gadget Circuit
  • America Cameras
  • AudioVideoNation
  • Nice Electronics (upsell scam)
  • fumfie (sells gray market but doesn’t inform buyer)
  • Abe’s of Maine (upsell scam)
  • Chat and Vision
  • rakuten
  • 6th Avenue Electronics/Express (use eBay only)

 

Most of these vendors sell gray market cameras without letting the customer know. How can you tell though? The price is lower than a popular site like B&H.

Unlike these sites, B&H, Adorama, etc are genuine retailers and have a minimum sale price set for their products, anyone who goes below this price can’t be a genuine re-seller of camera products.

It’s fine to buy a gray market camera, just don’t expect any warranty support. If you need warranty support for a gray market camera, try a third party service like squaretrade.

Waves MaxxAudio on Dell Workstations

This post will be a bit of a rant. I recently got a Dell Precision M4800, a professional mobile workstation.

It comes with software preloaded called Waves MaxxAudio, it provides some of the same features other notebooks include that can “make audio sound better”.

I’ve been comparing the sound output with MaxxAudio enabled, and MaxxAudio disabled. And while it does sound somewhat better while on. The audio still sounds terrible for some strange reason.

I turned the audio enhancement off, and the audio that came out sounded like a megaphone. I  instantly knew something was up. So I stuck the audio from the headphone jack straight into a calibrated audio spectrum analyzer and found that:

1. When MaxxAudio is ‘off’, It isn’t actually off. The mids are boosted, and bass/treble cut off to make the audio sound much worse than it should be

2. When MaxxAudio is ‘on’ It boosts the bass and treble to levels where music begins to sound nothing like what it was intended.

So what I did next was uninstall the realtek driver, and rebooted my PC. Music sounds much better now, not distorted, and full of adequate sub bass that i’m used to hearing from a semi-decent DAC.

 

Now, I really expected better from Dell. I find this completely unacceptable in a professional notebook. Audio coming out of the speakers, when audio enhancements are “off” should not be tampered with at all.

My advice is, UNINSTALL THIS CRAPWARE the moment you get it. Use the stock driver provided by microsoft. Wave audio’s enhancement software is nothing but a scam and a battery/CPU hog.

This is the only way to make the speakers and headphone jack sound normal again.